Journal cover Journal topic
Solid Earth An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.380 IF 2.380
  • IF 5-year value: 3.147 IF 5-year
    3.147
  • CiteScore value: 3.06 CiteScore
    3.06
  • SNIP value: 1.335 SNIP 1.335
  • IPP value: 2.81 IPP 2.81
  • SJR value: 0.779 SJR 0.779
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 32 Scimago H
    index 32
  • h5-index value: 31 h5-index 31
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-152
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2019-152
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 14 Nov 2019

Submitted as: research article | 14 Nov 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Solid Earth (SE).

Seismic waveform tomography of the Central and Eastern Mediterranean upper mantle

Nienke Blom1,a, Alexey Gokhberg2, and Andreas Fichtner2 Nienke Blom et al.
  • 1Bullard Laboratories, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rise, Cambridge CB3 0EZ, UK
  • 2Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zürich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland
  • apreviously at: Department of Earth Sciences, Universiteit Utrecht, Princetonlaan 8A, 3584 CB Utrecht, the Netherlands

Abstract. We present a seismic waveform tomography of the upper mantle beneath the Central and Eastern Mediterranean down to the mantle transition zone. Our methodology incorporates in a consistent manner the information from body and multimode surface waves, source effects, frequency dependence, wavefront healing, anisotropy and attenuation. This allows us to jointly image multiple parameters of the crust and upper mantle.

Based on the data from ~ 17 000 unique source-receiver pairs, gathered from 80 earthquakes, we image radially anisotropic S velocity, P velocity and density. We use a multi-scale approach in which the longest periods (100–150 s) are inverted first, broadening to a period band of 28–150 s. Thanks to a strategy that combines long-period signals and a separation of body and surface wave signals, we are able to image down to the transition zone in most of the model domain.

Our model shows considerable detail in especially the northern part of the domain, where data coverage is very dense, and displays a number of clear and coherent high-velocity structures across the domain that can be linked to episodes of current and past subduction. These include the Hellenic subduction zone, the Cyprus subduction zone and high-velocity anomalies beneath the Italian peninsula and the Dinarides. This model is able to explain data from new events that were not included in the inversion.

Nienke Blom et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Topical Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Nienke Blom et al.
Video supplement

Model of the Central and Eastern Mediterranean upper mantle N. Blom https://doi.org/10.5446/44014

Nienke Blom et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 258 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
163 89 6 258 40 5 4
  • HTML: 163
  • PDF: 89
  • XML: 6
  • Total: 258
  • Supplement: 40
  • BibTeX: 5
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 14 Nov 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 14 Nov 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 171 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 169 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 23 Jan 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
We have developed a model of what the Earth looks like in the upper 500 km beneath the Central and Eastern Mediterranean. Within this model, we can see parts of the African tectonic plate that have sunk underneath the European plate over the past tens of millions of years. This model was constructed using seismic waveform tomography: by matching the seismograms from many earthquakes we record at the surface to synthetic seismograms that were generated by simulating earthquake wave propagation.
We have developed a model of what the Earth looks like in the upper 500 km beneath the Central...
Citation