Journal cover Journal topic
Solid Earth An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 4.165 IF 4.165
  • IF 5-year value: 4.075 IF 5-year
    4.075
  • CiteScore value: 4.28 CiteScore
    4.28
  • SNIP value: 1.501 SNIP 1.501
  • SJR value: 1.060 SJR 1.060
  • IPP value: 4.21 IPP 4.21
  • h5-index value: 29 h5-index 29
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 27 Scimago H
    index 27
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2018-129
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2018-129
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 Jan 2019

Research article | 02 Jan 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Solid Earth (SE).

Induced seismicity in geologic carbon storage

Víctor Vilarrasa1,2, Jesus Carrera1,2, Sebastià Olivella3, Jonny Rutqvist4, and Lyesse Laloui5 Víctor Vilarrasa et al.
  • 1Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, Spanish National Research Council (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona, Spain
  • 2Associated Unit: Hydrogeology Group (UPC-CSIC), Barcelona, Spain
  • 3Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPCBarcelonaTech), Barcelona, Spain
  • 4Energy Geosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA, USA
  • 5Laboratory of Soil Mechanics, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland

Abstract. Geologic carbon storage, as well as other geo-energy applications, such as geothermal energy, seasonal natural gas storage and subsurface energy storage, imply fluid injection/extraction that causes changes in the effective stress field and induces (micro)seismicity. If felt, seismicity has a negative effect on public perception and may jeopardize wellbore stability and damage infrastructure. Thus, induced earthquakes should be minimized to successfully deploy geo-energies. However, the processes that trigger induced seismicity are not fully understood, which translates into a limited forecast ability of current predictive models. We aim at understanding the triggering mechanisms of induced seismicity and to develop methodologies to minimize its occurrence through dimensional and numerical analysis. We find that the properties of the injected fluid, e.g., water or CO2, have a significant effect on pressure buildup evolution and thus, on fracture/fault stability. In addition to pressure changes, the injected fluid usually reaches the injection formation at a lower temperature than that of the rock, inducing rock contraction, thermal stress reduction and stress redistribution around the cooled region. If low-permeable faults cross the injection formation, local stress changes are induced around them which may reduce their stability and eventually cause fault reactivation. To minimize the risk of inducing felt seismicity, we have developed characterization techniques to reduce the uncertainty on rock properties and subsurface heterogeneity both for the screening of injection sites and for the operation of projects. Overall, we contend that felt induced seismicity can be minimized provided that a proper site characterization, monitoring and pressure management are performed.

Víctor Vilarrasa et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Topical Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Víctor Vilarrasa et al.
Víctor Vilarrasa et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 346 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
277 65 4 346 2 2
  • HTML: 277
  • PDF: 65
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 346
  • BibTeX: 2
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 02 Jan 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 02 Jan 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 126 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 126 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
Latest update: 25 Mar 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
To meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit temperature increase below 2 ºC, Geologic Carbon Storage (GCS) will be necessary at the gigatone scale. But to successfully deploy GCS, seismicity induced by CO2 injection should be controlled and maintained below a threshold that does not generate nuisances to the population. We conclude that felt induced seismicity can be minimized provided that a proper site characterization, monitoring and pressure management are performed.
To meet the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit temperature increase below 2 ºC, Geologic...
Citation