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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/se-2015-134
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 27 Jan 2016

Research article | 27 Jan 2016

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This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript for further review has not been submitted.

Hydraulic fracturing in thick shale basins: problems in identifying faults in the Bowland and Weald Basins, UK

David K. Smythe David K. Smythe
  • 1College of Science and Engineering, University of Glasgow, Scotland
  • *now at: La Fontenille, 1, rue du Couchant, 11120 Ventenac en Minervois, France

Abstract. North American shale basins differ from their European counterparts in that the latter are one to two orders of magnitude smaller in area, but correspondingly thicker, and are cut or bounded by normal faults penetrating from the shale to the surface. There is thus an inherent risk of groundwater resource contamination via these faults during or after unconventional resource appraisal and development. US shale exploration experience cannot simply be transferred to the UK. The Bowland Basin, with 1900 m of Lower Carboniferous shale, is in the vanguard of UK shale gas development. A vertical appraisal well to test the shale by hydraulic fracturing (fracking), the first such in the UK, triggered earthquakes. Re-interpretation of the 3D seismic reflection data, and independently the well casing deformation data, both show that the well was drilled through the earthquake fault, and did not avoid it, as concluded by the exploration operator. Faulting in this thick shale is evidently difficult to recognise. The Weald Basin is a shallower Upper Jurassic unconventional oil play with stratigraphic similarities to the Bakken play of the Williston Basin, USA. Two Weald licensees have drilled, or have applied to drill, horizontal appraisal wells based on inadequate 2D seismic reflection data coverage. I show, using the data from the one horizontal well drilled to date, that one operator failed identify two small but significant through-going normal faults. The other operator portrayed a seismic line as an example of fault-free structure, but faulting had been smeared out by reprocessing. The case histories presented show that: (1) UK shale exploration to date is characterised by a low degree of technical competence, and (2) regulation, which is divided between four separate authorities, is not up to the task. If UK shale is to be exploited safely: (1) more sophisticated seismic imaging methods need to be developed and applied to both basins, to identify faults in shale with throws as small as 4–5 m, and (2) the current lax and inadequate regulatory regime must be overhauled, unified, and tightened up.

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David K. Smythe
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Short summary
Fracking of shale is a controversial industrial process for producing hydrocarbons. The UK shale basins, in contrast to the US basins, are pervaded by through-going geological faults. These will act as pathways for contamination of drinking water resources. But in the UK the exploration companies are able to ignore this risk because of inadequate regulation. Therefore the alleged success of fracking in the USA cannot be replicated in the UK, despite its promotion by the government.
Fracking of shale is a controversial industrial process for producing hydrocarbons. The UK shale...
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